Tag Archives: writing advice

Form study groups with your classmates. You can review the reading together and edit each other’s work.

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When you are first learning to write academically, too much info and too much citing is better than too little.

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Get a trusted friend or family member to read over your work. Let them know what the assignment is asking for and what areas you are concerned about so they can better help you.

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Word-of-the day email subscriptions can be a helpful way to boost vocabulary.

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“A word after a word after a word is power.” Margaret Atwood

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78. “I statements” like “I think, I feel, I believe” can weaken an argument. Avoid them.

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Fluff and clutter don’t add anything to your message. Instead, they just get in the way.

A little too short but clear, well-written, well-organized, and well-researched is better than long enough but full of extra words that don’t actually say anything.

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“You can fix anything but a blank page.” Nora Roberts

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There’s a difference between relevant info and padding, fluff, clutter, and redundancies.

Ask yourself: what does this word, sentence, paragraph add?

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Citing outside sources takes time and practice to learn. Practice in your personal writing, like emails, in order to improve!

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